Quality Quartz Timepieces
January 27, 2020
Time For Resolutions
January 28, 2020

A ROUND OR SQUARE CLASSIC WATCH MAY BE THE NORM BUT FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO STAND OUT, THESE TIMEPIECES WITH CONTRASTING STYLES WILL SURELY SATISFY

A ROUND OR SQUARE CLASSIC WATCH MAY BE THE NORM BUT FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO STAND OUT, THESE TIMEPIECES WITH CONTRASTING STYLES WILL SURELY SATISFY

When it comes to mechanical watches, the design and functionality of a timepiece has not deviated vastly over the years. Distinctive of earlier timepieces, a watch predominantly boasts a circular case with markers and hours, minutes and seconds hands. Over time, some watchmakers have pushed the boundaries by creating square and angular cases.

Still, at the very core of each watch lies its main functionality, which is to tell time. But with watches akin to pieces of art, some collectors yearn for timepieces that offer a certain expression of style. With a demand there for these alternative timepieces, some watchmakers have begun pushing the boundaries of design to create cool and unusual watches that have gone on to appeal to a new generation of wearers.

If you want to stand out from the crowd in the New Year, these timepieces will undoubtedly serve that need in impeccable form.

Curvy By Nature: Cartier Crash Skeleton

With a designed reminiscent of a clock in a Salvador Dali painting, the Cartier Crash is arguably the quirkiest watch ever made. Created in the late 60s, the watch features a curved, arched case with all the basic functions one would want in a watch, set on an openwork dial with Roman numerals. However the shape of the timepiece itself eludes the fact that the Cartier Crash is in fact a marvel of watchmaking as it features a modified Calibre 9618 manually-wound movement designed explicitly to fit into this complex designed case.

Direction of Style: BR 01 Turn Coordinator

Bell & Ross’ aviation inspired timepieces need little introduction. But even diehard fans were surprised when the watchmaker produced this stunning number that paid homage to the Turn Coordinator, a prominent and important instrument in aviation. The timepiece’s display is the most unique aspect of the model, with three black concentric discs rotating to indicate the hours, minutes and seconds. A mechanical automatic movement, tucked into the 46mm steel case with matte black PVD finish, works the functions of the watch.

Retro Styling: Omega Seamaster Bullhead

When it comes to watchmaking, Omega has relatively played it safe. But the brand defied convention with the release of the Seamaster Bullhead. Boasting a rare and unusual design, the timepiece was inspired by the original piece developed in 1969. The modern iteration of the watch is equipped with a crown on top and a chronograph pusher to adjust the internal rotating bezel at 6 o’clock.  Powered by the Omega Co-Axial Calibre 3113, the watch features a silver-coloured “Rallye” dial with a 60-minute scale along with a black bi-directional rotating inner bezel.

Hip To Be Square: TAG Heuer Monaco V4

From the moment of its big reveal in 1969, the Monaco was assured of being a classic. A timepiece ahead of its time, TAG Heuer equipped the watch with a futuristic square case and it was also the first self-winding chronograph to arrive on the market. Over the years, the timepiece still retains its basic design – the 39mm case, chronograph pushers on the right, and crown on the left – albeit with subtle tweaks in the design and mechanical department. In 2004, TAG Heuer, again broke new ground with the Monaco V4, which arrived as the world’s first belt-driven watch.

Second Glances: Jaquet Droz Grande Seconde

Modelled after a pocket watch founder Pierre Jaquet-Droz completed in 1784, the Grande Seconde features two intersecting dials that have become a hallmark of the brand. Blending form as well as function, the seconds dial takes prominence on the face with the hours and minutes dial sitting pretty at the top. It’s a unique design for sure but upon closer inspection, you’ll notice the Roman numerals switching to Arabic between 5 and 7 o’clock, the area where the large seconds sub dial intersects with the hours and minutes.

Game Changer: Reservoir Watch Supercharged

When it comes to defying convention, Reservoir Watch is one of the few that have managed to change the watchmaking game with its unique single-hand displays. Housed in a 43mm stainless steel case, the Supercharged is the epitomic of the brand’s approach to watchmaking with a design that pays homage to the dashboard instruments of classic sports cars. The main takeaway is naturally the one hand design, made even more remarkable as it also features a retrograde minute scale, jumping hour and a power reserve of 37 hours, all thanks to the ETA 2824-2 self-winding movement.

When it comes to mechanical watches, the design and functionality of a timepiece has not deviated vastly over the years. Distinctive of earlier timepieces, a watch predominantly boasts a circular case with markers and hours, minutes and seconds hands. Over time, some watchmakers have pushed the boundaries by creating square and angular cases.

Still, at the very core of each watch lies its main functionality, which is to tell time. But with watches akin to pieces of art, some collectors yearn for timepieces that offer a certain expression of style. With a demand there for these alternative timepieces, some watchmakers have begun pushing the boundaries of design to create cool and unusual watches that have gone on to appeal to a new generation of wearers.

If you want to stand out from the crowd in the New Year, these timepieces will undoubtedly serve that need in impeccable form.

Curvy By Nature: Cartier Crash Skeleton

With a designed reminiscent of a clock in a Salvador Dali painting, the Cartier Crash is arguably the quirkiest watch ever made. Created in the late 60s, the watch features a curved, arched case with all the basic functions one would want in a watch, set on an openwork dial with Roman numerals. However the shape of the timepiece itself eludes the fact that the Cartier Crash is in fact a marvel of watchmaking as it features a modified Calibre 9618 manually-wound movement designed explicitly to fit into this complex designed case.

Direction of Style: BR 01 Turn Coordinator

Bell & Ross’ aviation inspired timepieces need little introduction. But even diehard fans were surprised when the watchmaker produced this stunning number that paid homage to the Turn Coordinator, a prominent and important instrument in aviation. The timepiece’s display is the most unique aspect of the model, with three black concentric discs rotating to indicate the hours, minutes and seconds. A mechanical automatic movement, tucked into the 46mm steel case with matte black PVD finish, works the functions of the watch.

Retro Styling: Omega Seamaster Bullhead

When it comes to watchmaking, Omega has relatively played it safe. But the brand defied convention with the release of the Seamaster Bullhead. Boasting a rare and unusual design, the timepiece was inspired by the original piece developed in 1969. The modern iteration of the watch is equipped with a crown on top and a chronograph pusher to adjust the internal rotating bezel at 6 o’clock.  Powered by the Omega Co-Axial Calibre 3113, the watch features a silver-coloured “Rallye” dial with a 60-minute scale along with a black bi-directional rotating inner bezel.

Hip To Be Square: TAG Heuer Monaco V4

From the moment of its big reveal in 1969, the Monaco was assured of being a classic. A timepiece ahead of its time, TAG Heuer equipped the watch with a futuristic square case and it was also the first self-winding chronograph to arrive on the market. Over the years, the timepiece still retains its basic design – the 39mm case, chronograph pushers on the right, and crown on the left – albeit with subtle tweaks in the design and mechanical department. In 2004, TAG Heuer, again broke new ground with the Monaco V4, which arrived as the world’s first belt-driven watch.

Second Glances: Jaquet Droz Grande Seconde

Modelled after a pocket watch founder Pierre Jaquet-Droz completed in 1784, the Grande Seconde features two intersecting dials that have become a hallmark of the brand. Blending form as well as function, the seconds dial takes prominence on the face with the hours and minutes dial sitting pretty at the top. It’s a unique design for sure but upon closer inspection, you’ll notice the Roman numerals switching to Arabic between 5 and 7 o’clock, the area where the large seconds sub dial intersects with the hours and minutes.

Game Changer: Reservoir Watch Supercharged

When it comes to defying convention, Reservoir Watch is one of the few that have managed to change the watchmaking game with its unique single-hand displays. Housed in a 43mm stainless steel case, the Supercharged is the epitomic of the brand’s approach to watchmaking with a design that pays homage to the dashboard instruments of classic sports cars. The main takeaway is naturally the one hand design, made even more remarkable as it also features a retrograde minute scale, jumping hour and a power reserve of 37 hours, all thanks to the ETA 2824-2 self-winding movement.