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Like Father, Like Son: Successful Watchmakers

Like Father, Like Son: Successful Watchmakers

Throughout history, watchmaking has consistently been a family affair, oftentimes involving fine craftsmanship passed from father to son

 

Throughout history, watchmaking has consistently been a family affair, oftentimes involving fine craftsmanship passed from father to son.

Carrying on the family trade is more than just a badge of honour. In the past, it was common place for the family business to be passed from one generation to the next. This is especially true when it comes to skilled work and craftsmanship like watchmaking.

Passing the torch so to speak is not just important in terms of succession and continuity but also an assurance that the family trade is able to transcend through time. That unique attribute certainly holds true for a number of watchmaking brands, especially those with roots were put down by the talents and efforts of both father and son.

Legacy Of The Automata

Pierre Jaquet-Droz is not only the name behind the Jaquet Droz brand but he was also instrumental in spearheading the field of mechanical engineering and the automaton. Born in 1721, in Canton Neuchâtel, Switzerland, Jaquet-Droz was a pioneering watchmaker renowned for his clocks and automata. In 1768, he famously created the Writer, a mechanical marvel that took the shape of a boy that could write on paper. Still despite creating these inventive mechanisms, Jaquet-Droz was no less famous for his watchmaking prowess, which his son Henry-Louis took after. In 1774, the father and son duo set up a workshop in London, expanding the business and trade to the Far East. It was during this time when Jaquet Droz began incorporating elements of nature such as birds into clocks and pocket watches. That heritage still continues today with the brand continuously pushing the boundaries of watchmaking and automata with stunning timepieces like the Tropical Bird Repeater and Magic Lotus Automaton.

Masters Of Precision

John Arnold is undoubtedly one of the most famous watchmakers Great Britain has produced. Born in 1736 in Bodmin, Cornwall, the talented craftsman followed his father’s footsteps as a watchmaker, learning the trade as an apprentice. He eventually forged his own path,  building highly-accurate timepieces as well as chronometers. His son John Arnold joined the business in 1783 and four years later the company Arnold & Son was established. The same year, they made history by producing the first pocket chronometer. Both John and Roger worked as partners in the company for many years thereafter. Following his father’s death in 1799, Roger continued to run the business until he passed on in 1843. Today, Arnold & Son still retains the same product philosophy of producing traditional, hand-finished mechanical watches built with state-of-the-art technology. Timepieces such as the Globetrotter, Tourbillon Chronometer NO.36 and Time Pyramid Tourbillon are embodiment of the skills and talents that both John and Roger have given to the world of horology.

A Family Affair

Founded in 1755, Vacheron Constantin stands as one of the oldest watch manufacturers in world. Jean-Marc Vacheron set up the company in Geneva, Switzerland and immediately gained recognition for being an eager and inventive horologist.  Amongst his notable creations was the Silver Watch, which featured a key-wound movement. He also produced the first engine-tuned dials – an innovation adopted by many watchmakers. In 1785, Jean-Marc’s son Abraham took over the company and saw it through a decade of the French Revolution. Ensuring continuity in the family, Jean-Marc’s grandson, Jacques Barthélémy carried on the work set by his grandfather by becoming head of the company in 1810. During Jacques Barthélémy’s tenure, he expanded the business by exporting their timepieces into France and Italy. He also formed a partnership with businessman, Francois Constantin, hence creating the birth of Vacheron Constantin.  Today, the brand exemplifies excellence in watchmaking, with models such as the Les Cabinotiers Minute Repeater Tourbillon Sky Chart, Fiftysix Day-Date and Historiques Triple Calendrier 1942, all made with the standards set by Jean-Marc Vacheron over 265 years ago.

Perfect Partnership

When the skills of both father and son come together, the results can be truly wonderful. This ultimately sums up what the Tissot brand is all about. The company was created out of the partnership between Charles-Félicien Tissot, a gold case-fitter and his watchmaker son, Charles-Émile. In 1853, the duo founded the ‘Charles-Félicien Tissot & Son’ assembly shop in Le Locle, Switzerland producing a range of pocket watches and pendant watches. Ambitious as well as talented, the company set their sights on catering to the U.S. market and Russia. In the late 1880s, Charles-Émile’s son, established a branch in Russia, making it the brand’s biggest market. Today, Tissot watches are sold in over 160 countries and it exemplifies not just Swiss quality and reliability but also accessibility. Recent examples from the brand such as the Chemin Des Tourelles Skeleton, Le Locle Regulateur and T-Complication Chronometer are proof of that heritage.

Omega Men

When it comes to watches, the Omega brand needs little introduction. After all it is a pioneering brand famous for its range of dive watches like the Seamaster as well as models like the Globemaster and Speedmaster, which incidentally holds the distinction of being the first watch on the moon. Omega itself boasts a compelling story, especially its roots that began in 1848 with Louis Brandt, a watchmaker who plied a trade creating and selling key-wound pocket watches. Founding La Generale Watch Co in 1848, he sold his timepiece throughout Europe with the help of his sons César and Louis-Paul. His children would eventually succeed Louis Brandt in running the company and in 1879 the brothers acquired a factory in Switzerland where they pioneered the concept of in-house manufacturing. In 1885, the brothers released their first mass-produced caliber and in 1894, they unveiled the 19-line Omega Caliber, which not only broke new ground in watchmaking but would also go on to give the company its name in 1903. 

Throughout history, watchmaking has consistently been a family affair, oftentimes involving fine craftsmanship passed from father to son.

Carrying on the family trade is more than just a badge of honour. In the past, it was common place for the family business to be passed from one generation to the next. This is especially true when it comes to skilled work and craftsmanship like watchmaking.

Passing the torch so to speak is not just important in terms of succession and continuity but also an assurance that the family trade is able to transcend through time. That unique attribute certainly holds true for a number of watchmaking brands, especially those with roots were put down by the talents and efforts of both father and son.

Legacy Of The Automata

Pierre Jaquet-Droz is not only the name behind the Jaquet Droz brand but he was also instrumental in spearheading the field of mechanical engineering and the automaton. Born in 1721, in Canton Neuchâtel, Switzerland, Jaquet-Droz was a pioneering watchmaker renowned for his clocks and automata. In 1768, he famously created the Writer, a mechanical marvel that took the shape of a boy that could write on paper. Still despite creating these inventive mechanisms, Jaquet-Droz was no less famous for his watchmaking prowess, which his son Henry-Louis took after. In 1774, the father and son duo set up a workshop in London, expanding the business and trade to the Far East. It was during this time when Jaquet Droz began incorporating elements of nature such as birds into clocks and pocket watches. That heritage still continues today with the brand continuously pushing the boundaries of watchmaking and automata with stunning timepieces like the Tropical Bird Repeater and Magic Lotus Automaton.

Masters Of Precision

John Arnold is undoubtedly one of the most famous watchmakers Great Britain has produced. Born in 1736 in Bodmin, Cornwall, the talented craftsman followed his father’s footsteps as a watchmaker, learning the trade as an apprentice. He eventually forged his own path,  building highly-accurate timepieces as well as chronometers. His son John Arnold joined the business in 1783 and four years later the company Arnold & Son was established. The same year, they made history by producing the first pocket chronometer. Both John and Roger worked as partners in the company for many years thereafter. Following his father’s death in 1799, Roger continued to run the business until he passed on in 1843. Today, Arnold & Son still retains the same product philosophy of producing traditional, hand-finished mechanical watches built with state-of-the-art technology. Timepieces such as the Globetrotter, Tourbillon Chronometer NO.36 and Time Pyramid Tourbillon are embodiment of the skills and talents that both John and Roger have given to the world of horology.

A Family Affair

Founded in 1755, Vacheron Constantin stands as one of the oldest watch manufacturers in world. Jean-Marc Vacheron set up the company in Geneva, Switzerland and immediately gained recognition for being an eager and inventive horologist.  Amongst his notable creations was the Silver Watch, which featured a key-wound movement. He also produced the first engine-tuned dials – an innovation adopted by many watchmakers. In 1785, Jean-Marc’s son Abraham took over the company and saw it through a decade of the French Revolution. Ensuring continuity in the family, Jean-Marc’s grandson, Jacques Barthélémy carried on the work set by his grandfather by becoming head of the company in 1810. During Jacques Barthélémy’s tenure, he expanded the business by exporting their timepieces into France and Italy. He also formed a partnership with businessman, Francois Constantin, hence creating the birth of Vacheron Constantin.  Today, the brand exemplifies excellence in watchmaking, with models such as the Les Cabinotiers Minute Repeater Tourbillon Sky Chart, Fiftysix Day-Date and Historiques Triple Calendrier 1942, all made with the standards set by Jean-Marc Vacheron over 265 years ago.

Perfect Partnership

When the skills of both father and son come together, the results can be truly wonderful. This ultimately sums up what the Tissot brand is all about. The company was created out of the partnership between Charles-Félicien Tissot, a gold case-fitter and his watchmaker son, Charles-Émile. In 1853, the duo founded the ‘Charles-Félicien Tissot & Son’ assembly shop in Le Locle, Switzerland producing a range of pocket watches and pendant watches. Ambitious as well as talented, the company set their sights on catering to the U.S. market and Russia. In the late 1880s, Charles-Émile’s son, established a branch in Russia, making it the brand’s biggest market. Today, Tissot watches are sold in over 160 countries and it exemplifies not just Swiss quality and reliability but also accessibility. Recent examples from the brand such as the Chemin Des Tourelles Skeleton, Le Locle Regulateur and T-Complication Chronometer are proof of that heritage.

Omega Men

When it comes to watches, the Omega brand needs little introduction. After all it is a pioneering brand famous for its range of dive watches like the Seamaster as well as models like the Globemaster and Speedmaster, which incidentally holds the distinction of being the first watch on the moon. Omega itself boasts a compelling story, especially its roots that began in 1848 with Louis Brandt, a watchmaker who plied a trade creating and selling key-wound pocket watches. Founding La Generale Watch Co in 1848, he sold his timepiece throughout Europe with the help of his sons César and Louis-Paul. His children would eventually succeed Louis Brandt in running the company and in 1879 the brothers acquired a factory in Switzerland where they pioneered the concept of in-house manufacturing. In 1885, the brothers released their first mass-produced caliber and in 1894, they unveiled the 19-line Omega Caliber, which not only broke new ground in watchmaking but would also go on to give the company its name in 1903.