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The 20s design style and motif has inspired watchmakers to create beautiful timepieces armed with vintage appeal

The popularity of Art Deco can be traced back to the 1920s and 1930s, where it was developed into a major style of design in Europe and the United States. Also called style modern, the design concept represented both modernism and fashion. It was used predominantly in decorative arts and architecture and over the years into elements such as graphic design and also mass-produced wares.

The world of watchmaking has leveraged off Art Deco quite successfully over the years, providing horologists the opportunity to flex their creative muscles in creating beautiful and impeccable timepieces. The usage of Art Deco not only elevates a timepiece by providing it a vintage appeal but also injects a level of artistic and aesthetic merit as well. Here are some notable examples on how Art Deco has been used in creating some highly-memorable and attractive timepieces.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Acciaio

An inspired creation from its well-storied past, Panerai created this unique piece that borrowed design motifs from an Art Deco pendulum clock. Presented in a 47mm case, the Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Acciaio exudes a retro design with elegant Art Deco hour numerals and a railway minute track on the dial. For the first time ever, the brand also utilised spear-shaped hour and minute hands for the design as well. Beating within the case is a Calibre P. 3000 hand-wound movement, which delivers a power reserve of 72 hours. The Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Acciaio is worn with a natural leather strap, which gifts it a dressier appeal with added retro hints as well.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso

The history of the Reverso is well documented, especially with its ties to the sport of polo, which inspired Jaeger-LeCoultre to create a reversing case to protect the watch face. But the iconic timepiece is also known for its design, specifically its case style, which shares similar rectilinear lines and modernist design as Manhattan’s Chrysler Building. Its minimalist approach is also characterised by its timeless design, which evokes an Art Deco expression of aesthetics and geometric lines with easy-to-read Arabic numerals, baton hands and the elegant railtrack minute. Despite being created in the 1930s, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso is still considered one of the snazziest dress watches around.

Cartier Tortue

Although models like the Tank and Santos are more associated with Art Deco design, the Tortue itself is worthy of the same accolade. Like the Tonneau, the Tortue was also unveiled in the early 20th century and boasted a shape that was reportedly inspired by a tortoise. It instantly became a classic, setting itself apart from the round timepieces that were made at the time. The latest iteration of the model features a manufacture mechanical movement with manual winding, calibre 430 MC, which is encased in an 18K pink gold case. The timepiece is also designed with an octagonal crown set with a faceted sapphire, silvered guilloché dial with sunray effect and sword-shaped hands in blued steel.

Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921

The Historiques 1921 American is somewhat of a unique offering from Vacheron Constantin as it features an out-of-the-box dial set at a 45-degree angle. The newest version of the watch arrives in a 36.5mm case in rose gold and features a distinctive diagonal read-off complemented with Art Deco motifs such as the outer black railroad minutes track along with printed “Breguet” Arabic numerals. The off-centre crown nestled between 1 and 2’o clock further adds a dynamic appeal to the timepiece. Powered by a manual winding movement, Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921 arrives paired with a red shiny alligator strap, which pairs perfectly with any feminine style.

Frederique Constant Classics Art Déco

The new Classics Art Déco range from Frédérique Constant stands out in a number of areas, the first of which is what the collection stands for, which is affordable luxury. The range, exemplifies the qualities of classic and timeless beauty at its best with reliability to boot. The timepiece features an oval-shaped case that measures just 30mm x 25mm, and is powered by a FC- 200 quartz caliber movement. The range however lives up to its billing of Art Deco style with wonderfully delicate guilloché decoration in the centre of the dial along with hand-applied, polished Arabic or Roman numerals. Strap options are made available in grey satin, brown satin, yellow gold plated or stainless steel bracelets.

The popularity of Art Deco can be traced back to the 1920s and 1930s, where it was developed into a major style of design in Europe and the United States. Also called style modern, the design concept represented both modernism and fashion. It was used predominantly in decorative arts and architecture and over the years into elements such as graphic design and also mass-produced wares.

The world of watchmaking has leveraged off Art Deco quite successfully over the years, providing horologists the opportunity to flex their creative muscles in creating beautiful and impeccable timepieces. The usage of Art Deco not only elevates a timepiece by providing it a vintage appeal but also injects a level of artistic and aesthetic merit as well. Here are some notable examples on how Art Deco has been used in creating some highly-memorable and attractive timepieces.

Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Acciaio

An inspired creation from its well-storied past, Panerai created this unique piece that borrowed design motifs from an Art Deco pendulum clock. Presented in a 47mm case, the Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Acciaio exudes a retro design with elegant Art Deco hour numerals and a railway minute track on the dial. For the first time ever, the brand also utilised spear-shaped hour and minute hands for the design as well. Beating within the case is a Calibre P. 3000 hand-wound movement, which delivers a power reserve of 72 hours. The Panerai Radiomir 1940 3 Days Acciaio is worn with a natural leather strap, which gifts it a dressier appeal with added retro hints as well.

Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso

The history of the Reverso is well documented, especially with its ties to the sport of polo, which inspired Jaeger-LeCoultre to create a reversing case to protect the watch face. But the iconic timepiece is also known for its design, specifically its case style, which shares similar rectilinear lines and modernist design as Manhattan’s Chrysler Building. Its minimalist approach is also characterised by its timeless design, which evokes an Art Deco expression of aesthetics and geometric lines with easy-to-read Arabic numerals, baton hands and the elegant railtrack minute. Despite being created in the 1930s, the Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso is still considered one of the snazziest dress watches around.

Cartier Tortue

Although models like the Tank and Santos are more associated with Art Deco design, the Tortue itself is worthy of the same accolade. Like the Tonneau, the Tortue was also unveiled in the early 20th century and boasted a shape that was reportedly inspired by a tortoise. It instantly became a classic, setting itself apart from the round timepieces that were made at the time. The latest iteration of the model features a manufacture mechanical movement with manual winding, calibre 430 MC, which is encased in an 18K pink gold case. The timepiece is also designed with an octagonal crown set with a faceted sapphire, silvered guilloché dial with sunray effect and sword-shaped hands in blued steel.

Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921

The Historiques 1921 American is somewhat of a unique offering from Vacheron Constantin as it features an out-of-the-box dial set at a 45-degree angle. The newest version of the watch arrives in a 36.5mm case in rose gold and features a distinctive diagonal read-off complemented with Art Deco motifs such as the outer black railroad minutes track along with printed “Breguet” Arabic numerals. The off-centre crown nestled between 1 and 2’o clock further adds a dynamic appeal to the timepiece. Powered by a manual winding movement, Vacheron Constantin Historiques American 1921 arrives paired with a red shiny alligator strap, which pairs perfectly with any feminine style.

Frederique Constant Classics Art Déco

The new Classics Art Déco range from Frédérique Constant stands out in a number of areas, the first of which is what the collection stands for, which is affordable luxury. The range, exemplifies the qualities of classic and timeless beauty at its best with reliability to boot. The timepiece features an oval-shaped case that measures just 30mm x 25mm, and is powered by a FC- 200 quartz caliber movement. The range however lives up to its billing of Art Deco style with wonderfully delicate guilloché decoration in the centre of the dial along with hand-applied, polished Arabic or Roman numerals. Strap options are made available in grey satin, brown satin, yellow gold plated or stainless steel bracelets.